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The Armorial Register - International Register of Arms - Treen, G.L.

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Last Update: 27/12/2019

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Gwenneth Lucille Treen

Registered: The International Register of Arms, 27th December 2019. Registration No. 0521 (Vol.3). 

Arms: Per chevron embattled Or and Vert in chief two oak trees and in base a garb counterchanged.

Crest: Issuant from a Loyalist military coronet Or an oak tree Vert charged with a lily Or.

Motto: (Below the shield) From Family, Strength (Above the shield) A-Barth An Myghtern.

Grant: Chief Herald of Canada:15 September 2008. Registered in The Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada, vol. V, p. 348.

Tartan: Saskatchewan (district)

Club: Union Club of B.C.

The Arms of Gwenneth Lucille Treen

Gwenneth Lucille Treen, U.E, is the second daughter of the late Lewis Earl Treen, U.E, sometime Royal Canadian Army Service Corps [1942-1945], by his wife Bertha Mae, dau. of William M. Lambert; and being descendant of Joseph Treen, United Empire Loyalist [1744-1833], sometime Westchester Chasseurs [1777]. By Ron Schwieger has issue: Robert Gerhard Braun, U.E. Married 1972 Robin Bruce Mackie, Esq. (q.v), now of Carrickbraith, and by him has further issue: Christopher Stirling Treen Mackie, U.E, barrister-at-law & late A/SLt R.C.N.

The armiger’s Treen forefathers hailed from Land’s End, Cornwall. It is believed that they originated in the nearby village of Treen (also Treryn, Trethyn). The name derives from Cornish words meaning a ‘fortified settlement’. Fittingly, next to the village of Treen is an Iron-Age promontory hillfort, Treen Dinas, from which the village takes its name. Locals know the fort as, ‘The Giant’s Castle’, after a legend that a necromantic ogre created the place.

There are surnames in Cornwall and Wales that are homophonous with Treen and that have arms associated with them, e.g. Sir John Trewyn: Az. a chevron Arg. betw. three trees eradicated Or [vide Glover’s Ordinary]; and the Manor of Trewyn: Az, a chevron betw. three oak trees eradicated Or [vide Burke's General Armory]. These arms likely use trees as an English allusion to the surname and suggested the use of trees in Ms Treen's arms.

Accordingly, her crest is also a tree. Furthermore, an oak tree appears as the central charge in the arms of the principal Lambert family in England (viz. the baronets Lambert, of London: Arg. on a mount an oak tree Vt, and a greyhound courant Gu). And the armiger’s mother bore this same surname. The lily (a symbol of Saint Joseph) denotes Ms Treen’s Loyalist forefather, whose Christian name was Joseph. And a Loyalist military coronet surrounds the whole, in recognition of Joseph’s service with the élite Westchester Chasseurs, also known as, 'DeLancey’s Cow-boys' (from their additional duty of raiding for cattle and other supplies to support Loyalist forces in New York City). While serving as a ‘Cow-boy’, Joseph suffered a sabre cut to the head in an engagement on 30 October 1777 (probably at ‘Williams’ House’, Westchester), and was taken prisoner. After his eventual release he received from the British Crown a grant of 500 acres in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia, in recognition of his service. Curiously, Joseph’s brother was William Treen, a famous privateer for the American rebels.

The slogan above the crest means, “for the king!”, and expresses the Loyalist sentiment of Joseph, rendered in Cornish in remembrance of his heritage.

The other Trewyn arms also inspired the use of the division per chevron in Ms Treen's shield. But here the chevron shape is embattled to signify a ‘fortified settlement’ – the chevron suggesting the eaves of a settlement; and the embattling, its fortification.

The tinctures of the shield are those of the Royal Arms of Saskatchewan, in which province the armiger was born and raised. In the base of her arms, a golden garb on a green field also recalls the arms of Saskatchewan. Additionally, Cumberland County (where Joseph refuged) employs a yellow wheat sheaf as the central element in its municipal symbol. Finally, the armiger’s given name originates with the Cornish word gwaneth, meaning wheat.

Ms Treen’s motto, FROM FAMILY, STRENGTH, recalls the loving emphasis she and her mother place on family. It also echoes the royal motto of Saskatchewan, MULTIS E GENTIBUS VIRES.

 

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The Armorial Bearings of Gwenneth Lucille Treen